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20131101
20131130
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ALJAZAM 55
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English 55
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
views on contraception. which is why we made sure churches and other houses of worship, they don't have to provide it. they don't have to paid for it. >> when it was announced the supreme court would hear the hop hobby lobby case yesterday, the white house put out a statement. our policy is designed to insure that healthcare decisions are made between a woman and her doctor. the president believes that no one, including the government or for-profit corporations should be able to dictate those decisions to women. over the summer the tenth circuit court of appeals in denver ruled in favor of hobby lobby contending because it's not a publicly traded corporation hobby lobby is entitled to be ex-earth from the contraceptive mandate. the supreme court is expected to hear the case in march. >> here now are lori windom, senior counsel representing hobby lobby. and reporter from the religious news service, and fred geddes professor of law at brigham young university law school. help us know what this is about, what is the difference between a person saying to an insurer i don't want that, and i
of churches and other houses of worship, they don't have to worship, they don't have to provide it. provide it. they don't have to paid for it. they don't have to paid for it. >> when it was announced the >> when it was announced the supreme court would hear the hop supreme court would hear the hop hobby lobby case yesterday, the hobby lobby case yesterday, the white house put out a statement. white house put out a statement. our policy is designed to insure our policy is designed to insure that healthcare decisions are that healthcare decisions are made between a woman and her made between a woman and her doctor. doctor. the president believes that no the president believes that no one, including the government or one, including the government or for-profit corporations should for-profit corporations should be able to dictate those be able to dictate those decisions to women. decisions to women. over the summer the tenth over the summer the tenth circuit court of appeals in circuit court of appeals in denver ruled in favor of hobby denver ruled in favor of hobby lobby contending because it's
to act quickly, don't they? is that where a lot of mistakes are made? not in a sustained relationship, charity that you give to year after year, but want to go respond to a specific event. >> yeah, that's right. i think that we see that it leads to problems sometimes. the other panelists mentioned most of the money is given early on in disasters and if you look at early disaster response it's not always money. you see logistical problems in airports and because of the infrastructure in these places have been destroyed. often money earned in early stages is not a bottleneck to recovery. >> we're going to take a short break now and continue our discussion in a moment. this is "inside story." >> international outrage. >> a day of political posturing. >> every morning from 5 to 9am al jazeera america brings you more us and global news than any other american news channel. >> tell us exactly what is behind this story. >> from more sources around the world. >> the situation has intensified here at the border. >> start every morning, every day, 5am to 9 eastern with al jazeera america. >> we
that this isn't anything that doesn't benefit from inside. but on the outside they don't know where the price is going, and they certainly don't know what is growth of the company is going to be. so that's where you get into trouble. >> isn't it ironic twitser a source of democracy on the web, where people can say anything, but does the nature of an i.p.o. make this moment elightening us the. >> it is an exclusive process. twitser not offering all of its shares up to the public, it is only offering a small slice, and they are just aren't enough to go around to everyone that wants them. >> so what does twitter buying selling or creating we will talk about that when we come back? (vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter wh
it into five pieces, as long as five pieces get done, i don't care what it looks like as long as it's delivering on those core values that we talk about. what we don't want to do is carve out one piece of it, let's say agriculture jobs, which are important, but is easier, frankly, or the high-skilled jobs that many in your audience would immediately want to do. but leave behind some of the tougher stuff that still needs to get done. >> reporter: this renewed effort for immigration reform comes nearly five months after the senate passed a bipartisan comprehensive bill called "the border security economic opportunity and immigration modernization act." it is now in the hands of the house. the senate version includes border security, it doubles the size of border control with the mandatory force. a path to citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants, and worker visas, more high tech and low-skilled worker visas requires a workplace verification system for employers. and law enforcement detailing protections for workers, refugee provisions and what happens if an immigrant breaks
this corrected so they can move forward with other reforms. we don't want to see the american people fail. that's what is going on right now. they're losing faith in their government and their president. >> is it fair to say that main street may not be rooting for failure, but there are republicans on the hill who are? >> that's exactly true. >> november is a very long way away. >> not only is november a very long way away, but let's not forget that the republican party is not exactly riding high in the eyes of the american people right now. every survey that i've seen suggests that even after the past six weeks the american people think even less well of the republican party than they do of the democratic party. the margin is not unsubstangs. so i think there are real risks, risks that could be exacerbated if they do overplay their hand. so i would council moderation at this point. if the other side is--if the other side is hanging itself, you know, you don't pull out a gun and start shooting. >> we'll look at more perils and prospects of both parties. this is "inside story." >> while you were
commanders a disservice. i don't think they should be distracted by having to handle legal matters. and in any organization they're going to want to continue to own their own truth. right now they're above the law. i think to allow commanders to make these decisions is unfair to the victim. it's unfair to the accused, and it's unfair to the commander. i do agree with that statement. i think that it's up to congress right now to make those changes so that victims don't have to continue to experience exactly what you just described. >> eugene, is this a current system that has only become more unworkable as more women have entered the ranks? >> yes, it is, ray, although the issues with the system go far beyond issues relating to women. and there are many men as well in uniform who are victims of sexual assault. the system has important parts that goes way before there were women in the service. i'm talking about the command centric aspect of the system. the role that the commander plays in the administration of justice. for that we have among others george iii the king to thank. he w
in your red to go cup. you don't chuck, you sip, you savor it. >> i love craft beer because it is very delicious, and it is constantly evolving, and it has many different behavior flavorsi feel that i' i'm constantly learning new things about it. >> reporter: defined craft is artisan. brewers focus on new interpretations of old styles and create new ones. handcrafted it's distinctly american. craft beer drinkers consume six percent of the total beer market but that equals $10 billion in retail sales last year. sales of the big beers, the ones even non-drinkers know, coor's, budweiser, grew by 1% last year but craft beer is booming. this niche market saw a 15% increase in volume, and this was the sixth straight year of double-digit growth even in the midst of high employment and sagging salaries. craft beer would appear recession proof. >> i like craft beer instead of something like a budweiser, miller's coor's because you can pursue different flavors and learn about different styles. there is not just one type of beer that maybe gives you a bu buzz. >> reporter: large manufacturers are
for advise and consent. >> i certainly don't believe that the process is currently conducted is something that could possibly envisioned. and my first law review article was on the federalist paper, and i teach constitutional history. and here is why. supreme court nominees have always been the subject. even from 1789. so he was promptly subject to no consent by the senate. so for the supreme court, there has always been -- they have always been highly politically charged. but what has happened in the last 40 years is this has trickled down to the court of amiles level, and to the district court level. and it's truly unfortunate, because i think it has a negative effect on those who are the most qualified to serve. those who have the widest experience, those who should be easy -- it should be easy to confirm them. so the framers believed in a senatorial advice role, but it was never this bill political show. short of the supreme court. >> so now that you have said that, looking back at recent history, the inch is still pretty wet on this new rule to take down the 60 votes needed and move
the republicans, but i don't think that we can say that he was doing well. he also lost support during that shutdown debate. while the american people do blame the republicans for the shutdown, what we also see is that they are aren't all that impressed with the president's leadership to bring together some sort of compromise ordeal or resolution more quickly than he had. i also think an historic perspective, you realize that all presidents lose support over the course of their terms, the only exception is ronald reagan and bill clinton. to see the president in all fairness, he's more the norm than the exception. >> is the problem perception the american public saying who is in control? who is unking things? or is it fundamental in terms of the nsa, the spying, also healthcare, is it fundamental in terms of who actually is in control? >> i think it's a combination. presidents really have to show leadership and be in control. as much as you want to deflect to a recalcitrant or unpopular group of congressmen, at the end of the day people look to their president for leadership. there is a
in this century. which more important we don't see that in the international community, to put its efforts. we still see actions the international community dealing as a business rather than focusing on finding an end to the conflict in syria. >> president assad's force versus gained ground against the rebels. what is the significance of that? >> it's two steps forward and one step back for this regime. it's not moving. it's not going anywhere. it has essentially license to slaughter it's own people as long as it doesn't use the chemical weapons. i would agree that this is a humanitarian catastrophe. you have 100,000 dead. if we don't take up. >> apparently the assad regime has agreed to give up it's chemical weapons so it won't be able to slaughter its people with chemical weapons. we see increased weapons but not enough to overthrow the regime or oh depend themselves. you need to have a game changer, hopefully it comes at the peace table. unless you marry diplomacy, another 100,000 will be dead by going into next year. >> what was the general perception when the u.s. stepped forward and said
not belong in your red to go cup. in your red to go cup. you don't chuck, you sip, you you don't chuck, you sip, you savor it. savor it. >> i love craft beer because it >> i love craft beer because it is very delicious, and it is is very delicious, and it is constantly evolving, and it has constantly evolving, and it has many different behavior many different behavior flavors, and i flavors, and i feel that i'm feel that i'm i'm constantly i'm constantly learning new things about it. learning new things about it. >> reporter: defined craft is >> reporter: defined craft is artisan. artisan. brewers focus on new brewers focus on new interpretations of old styles interpretations of old styles and create new ones. and create new ones. handcrafted it's distinctly handcrafted it's distinctly american. american. craft beer drinkers consume six craft beer drinkers consume six percent of the total beer market percent of the total beer market but that equals $10 billion in but that equals $10 billion in retail sales last year. retail sales last year. sales of the big beers, the ones sales of the big
to - is it the business community, dream e the young people brought to the country - who has the ear? >> i don't think it's one group in particular. one thing that is different is immigration is different from district to district, from state to state. one thing that is constant is the faith based community and the public safety community. both von aggressive throughout the nation, talking about the impacts of immigration. it's important for business communities and dreamers and those that are effected directly. there's nothing like having the faith-based community throughout the nation sending the same message to individual members. forward. >> do you feel like a trailblazer, the first republican to get on board with the bill. >> i know it's something that has to get done. it's something i feel in my own family, in our community. i'm elected to be a leader. i expect to see more leaders willing to step forward. i had a number of members coming to me afterwards saying, "look, this is not something i have had to deal with in my district. tell me why it's important." we are having a dialogue, that's what we
tend to regulate that in this country. >> we don't like people making their own moonshine. >> the science behind e-cigaretts. >> wow, ya, now we're actually spiking. and to contact the centers and >> welcome back to "inside story." we're going to turn now to colorado where the taxes are on the table, and that's about where they stayed. still us with in las vegas david de moore of latino decisions. and david sirota and mark from the "washington post" here in studio. you're following this closely. big referendum issue to help fund and redefine the way public education is funded. it did not succeed. a, were you surprised, and b, what were the the implications? >> i was not surprised. this was a ballot measure that had a lot of outside money coming in from a very anti-public school foundation, the walton family, michael bloomberg, anti-union, against the teachers union. it pore ported to raise revenue but a lot of that money would be earmarked to go into privately administered charter schools. there were sixes about what the ballot measure was, and it didn't succeed. at the sa
. >> the powers that be at home and around the world... >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even have to explain why? >> well thats exactly what i said. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism at it's toughest. >> welcome book "inside story." our 2013 election results and what it means for the road ahead. we want to return to new jersey and governor chris christie' huge victory. with us david, and david, and mark with us in studio from the "washington post." before we go to new jersey, the tea party, tea leaves for the tea party coming out of virginia, start with that. >> well, the mainstream business oriented republicans would love for the narrative was that the tea party was damaged. they didn't get their man in, and without support, ken cuccinelli received nothing. he was cut off a month ago, and still he came extremely close to winning this with support from tea party activists, christian conservatives, that's the coalition that the mainstream republicans who want to go bac
an argument that this isn't anything that doesn't benefit from inside. but on the outside they don't know where the price is going, and they certainly don't know what is growth of the company is going to be. so that's where you get into trouble. >> isn't it ironic twitser a source of democracy on the web, where people can say anything, but does the nature of an i.p.o. make this moment elightening us the. >> it is an exclusive process. twitser not offering all of its shares up to the public, it is only offering a small slice, and they are just aren't enough to go around to everyone that wants them. >> so what does twitter buying selling or creating we will talk about that when we come back? news stories? >> they share it on the stream. >> social media isn't an after-thought, it drives discussion across america. >> al jazeera america's social media community, on tv and online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations. >> post, upload and interact. >> every night share undiscovered stories. we are back talking about twilter. still with us is john wassic. a personal investment and the a
. i don't know that she thought it was going to take this long, but it's very sweet to finally be here . >> were lawyers ready to take on your case in the early 90s? were they encouraging about your prospects of success? >> no, we were not very sophisticated. this was not part of organized effort. we were in love. we wanted to get married. we applied for a license. at that time there was no organization gay or otherwise, that was willing to represent us. the aclu did submit friend of the court briefs. they were the first group on board, but we went with dan foley, a wonderful constitutional lawyer who was in private practice, and he will always be a hero to me. >> what changed? and were the things that happened along the way that encouraged you that this really was going to end in a result where hawaiians will be able to get married in same-gender couples? >> you know, we won in court with the hawai'i supreme court. apparently the public of hawai'i was not ready for it yet, and so amended the constitution to say that the legislature could limit marriage to a man and a woman. and as a r
like to leave a place better off than when they found it. and this is a challenge. but i don't think it's in national interest, ray. and i would put it a little bit differently than i would put the terror question. i would like to do everything i could to keep the pressure on. i would like to see, obviously, the future relationship with afghanistan be one where afghans will take the primary responsibility and we will do everything we can to support them. and i suspect that that's a more likely approach. we have not been successfully totally in eliminating al-qaeda from pakistan but we have done a good job in getting the leadership. i think it is that erosion of al-qaeda that is more likely to be the reality. i would hope for elimination, but i have my doubts it's within the range of our possibilities. >> so david, a less vulnerable, a less insecure afghanistan is one that's less likely to be a danger to the united states in the future? >> an afghanistan that has the security capabilities to defend itself both from enemies internally and domestic. and we have done that we have worked wit
for a long time. they really wanted this deal to occur. on the case of u.s. air ways, i don't know if they were as giddy about it as we were here. but it would be more difficult time against two other mega airlines which are delta and united. >> so they have more job security? >> i think that many of them think they will. i agree with them. i think they will actually be doing some growth. there will be certain cities where there will be cut backs over time but it looks like part of the settlement includes in three to five year window where they can't cut back in certain hubs they would like to, but that's part of the settlement as well. >> douglas kidd what about the flying public? what is their interest here? >> the flying public has one interest, and that is being able to fly, and of course flying on an airline that is not facing bankruptcy, and that is hopefully making money and will be in a position to treat the customer and the passenger gregory. when an airline is facing financial difficulty, there is a tendency to pinch pennies. it's quite another when american airlines in t
necessarily a free ride. >> you don't see this as an overwhelming endorsement for chris christie? >> hmm, he brought together a nice coalition but his message was very different from some of the other republicans there. he's focused on governing. he's invested in education. we saw late in the campaign he switched his campaign on instate tuition for answer authorized immigrants and he did quite well among latino voters there. he is a governor who basically based his reputation on i want to governor. i don't want to be an ideologue. this is a good mention in the state , and it gives him an opportunity to get beyond the polarization and claim action for governoring. >> david sirota, how does a guy like chris christie, with the acceptance speech, we get things done. they should be watching this in washington. how does that play in denver? how does this play across the country? >> chris christie figured out what ronald reagan figured out. he's making sure he's positioning himself for president. the way he has done that is by instate stressing the parts of his record that he finds common ground wi
will have to be verified, will have to be perfectly done in extremely tight control, and i don't think the iranians have been able thus far to provide the kind of assurances that both sides the united states is insisting upon. >> but professor, has the reaction from the netanyahu government been so negative that even attempts to try to build in those assurances are met with such skepticism that it sounds like there is nothing that israel will accept that comes from the mouth of the current tehran government. >> well, this is true . the netanyahu position is that allowing iranian enreaching rue hane yum will not be accepted by accepted by israel. . they do not want to see enrichment of uranium on their soil. they also don't want to sigh the production of plutonium which is also useful in creating a nuclear weapon. the israelis without question has put tremendous pressure on the united states in asking, in fact, demanding if you want to go ahead and make a deal, that's fine, but we're not prepared to accept it, and we're going to have to make our own decision. when it comes to israeli na
: the survivors, the aftermath is apocalyptic. >> we need help. we don't have anything to eat. our food is lost. >> reporter: desperate people are looting. >> we forced open the petrol station because we cannot travel. we need fuel. we want to travel to other places to buy food because all the groceries have been ransacked. >> reporter: a lack of central control has become a hurdle in the aid effort. just three years into his term president aquino is facing one of the biggest challenges of his career, rebuilding an entire region from the ground up. >> the officials are here to an insure that help is give to you the fastest way possible and things are restored to their national order. >> the u.s. is offering help for their recovery by sending marines. >> a disaster of this magnitude to quickly overrun any force, any government. what we can do is supplement the existing rotary wing lift that they already possess. >> southern china is now facing the at typhoon. streets flooded, schools have been ordered closed and fishing ports knock the down. craig, welcome to "inside story." the scene behind yo
veterans in the world. [applause] so when we talk about fulfilling our promises to our veterans we don't mean just for a few years, we mean now, tomorrow, and forever. not just for generations past, but for this generation of veterans and all who will follow. that's why as commander in chief i'll keep making sure we're providing unprecedented support to our veterans. even as we make-- [applause] --even as we make difficult choices as a nation we're going to keep making vital investments in our veterans. we'll keep improving veteran healthcare including mental healthcare so you can stay strong. making sure that veterans not covered by the va can secure quality affordable health insurance. we'll keep producing the claims backlog. we splashed it by a third since march, and we'll keep at it so you can get the benefits that you have earned and that you need when you need them. [applause] we're going keep helping our newest veterans and their families pursue their education. under the post 9/11 g.i. bill. we welcomed our 1 millionth student veteran, and we're ready for all those who come nex
they don't make money on an airplane, they pull it, and they pull it out and move it someplace else. where, they are deciding that they are going to quit serving mobile alabama. mobile alabama chamber of commerce jumped only an airplane, got businesses together, flew to air tran's head effort yeaher and promised them they would support the airline. gave them concrete promises of an o. of money they would spend. air tran backed off. a year later, air tran has to withdraw from mobile, because they did not have the business that they needed to have it. it is just the way it is. it's the way we live today, it isn't like r exa where every farm was given electricity and that was all subsidized. what would be a luxurious way to travel has become mas. transit, and available out of the major cities. pierre, etc. >> in the days before deregulation, those bad old days before deregulation, one of the trade offs was that carriers would service these smaller markets because they were guaranteed certain access to the larger markets. and the economic model worked out. now some of the places that terry fla
, but there are new solutions in tonight's "inside story." >> hello, today there are nearly a billion people who don't have enough to eat or who face food insecurity. by 2050 with 9 billion people in the world, the climate change and challenges will multi my, my. tonight what is being done and tonight what can be done to feed the plant. climate change is expected to change many things but a particular threat comes to the food we grow. projections suggest global food productions could decline. this is according to a summary for the u.n.'s governmental panel of climate change. the next report is due out in march. the next report is expected to show how need for food will ri rise. bankruptcy among farmers from water shortages and other disruptions. infrastructure and ecosystem failures from extreme weather and flooding caused by rising sea levels. and heat waves which can spread to countries around the world. these trends and more provide backdrop as these food experts met. >> we have a daunting task ahead of us. today we have about 1 billion people who are suffering from malnutrition, and we talk abou
consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> and now, a techknow minute... >> evey weeknight on al jazeera america change the way you look at news tune into live news at 8 and 11 >> i'm john seigenthaler and here's a look at the headlines.. >> infomation changes by the hour here... >> our team of award winning journalists brings you up to the minute coverage of today's events... then, at 9 and midnight. america tonight goes deeper with groundbreaking investigative coverage of the nation's top stories... >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you... >> live news at 8 and 11 eastern followed by america tonight on al jazeera america there's more to it. >> welcome back. we're talking a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)